:

Making Job Search Easier by Finding the Great Companies First

Find a
JOB
Title/Keywords Company Name
City, state or zip (optional)
 

Should You Work at HBO or Netflix?

Should You Work at HBO or Netflix?

Over 130 mil­lion peo­ple sub­scribe to HBO glob­al­ly.  Found­ed in 1972 with its first launch on a cable sys­tem serv­ing Wilkes Barre Penn­syl­va­nia with the 1971 film, some­times a Great Notion, star­ring Paul New­man and Hen­ry Fon­da, HBO was the world’s first “pay” tv ser­vice. Orig­i­nal­ly pri­mar­i­ly air­ing movies over time it has evolved into one of the most suc­cess­ful and pro­lif­ic pro­duc­ers of orig­i­nal shows. From today’s Game of Thrones to the Sopra­nos and True Blood of the past HBO is known for some of the most watched orig­i­nal pro­gram­ming on tele­vi­sion. In 2015 HBO entered the “OTT” video mar­ket with the launch of their direct to con­sumer ser­vice HBO Now. With over $2 bil­lion dol­lars in annu­al income HBO has a strong cap­i­tal base for expan­sion. But what about the com­pe­ti­tion from Net­flix and Ama­zon?  Net­flix has been spend­ing bil­lions of dol­lars cre­at­ing orig­i­nal pro­gram­ming for broad­cast on their ser­vice.  As of April 2017 Net­flix was report­ing in excess of 99 mil­lion sub­scribers world­wide. But while most of HBO’s dis­tri­b­u­tion is through deals with cable oper­a­tors, vir­tu­al­ly all of Netflix’s sub­scribers are direct. Ama­zon is also a for­mi­da­ble com­peti­tor hav­ing devel­oped a video ser­vice for their Prime mem­bers…

Read More

What should A.I. Developers and Marketers know about the Autonomous Car revolution

What should A.I. Developers and Marketers know about the Autonomous Car revolution

Your auto­mo­bile will soon be the ulti­mate media immer­sion tool, watch Net­flix (jobs at Net­flix), YouTube, Play VR base­ball against your friend in anoth­er autonomous car. Yeah so what if that was sup­posed to be Sci­ence Fic­tion stuff, it is here now, accept it! Could you imag­ine plan­ning an even longer com­mute to get more work done while in your car away from the hus­band and kids. Jason Har­ri­son, glob­al CEO of Gain The­o­ry says “Cars are essen­tial­ly becom­ing the next must-have mobile device.” Price­wa­ter­house­C­oop­ers projects that spend­ing in the autonomous-car indus­try will bal­loon to $43.2 bil­lion glob­al­ly by 2021. Elec­tric Car man­u­fac­tur­er Tes­la (jobs at Tes­la) is adding 1,600 employ­ees to fast-track its autonomous dri­ving efforts. Ford just made a deal with Google to col­lab­o­rate on the automak­er’s autonomous ambi­tions. Gen­er­al Motors revealed it is invest­ing $500 mil­lion in the car-ser­vice app Lyft in order to beat its com­peti­tors to the self-dri­v­ing future. Mer­cedes-Benz joined with con­nec­t­ed-home play­er Nest to cre­ate ETA, a tool that enables a car approach­ing one’s house to send a sig­nal to adjust the ther­mo­stat ahead of time. “Rather than open­ing up an own­er’s man­u­al that’s 500–600 pages long, you watch a lit­tle bit of the video, put…

Read More

Which Video Streaming Providers will Survive in the Next 5 Years?

Which OTT Providers will Survive in the Next 5 Years?

There are many more OTT providers than you real­ize.  One ser­vice offers to pro­vide you with 600 chan­nels. A Mash­able arti­cle promis­es 33 Ways to Watch Free TV Online and of course there are the usu­al sus­pects; Hulu, Net­flix, Ama­zon Prime, CBS, Crack­le and the list goes on and on. By the way the indus­try term for Video Stream­ing is OTT for over the top. But Which Video Stream­ing Providers will Sur­vive and Why? In Secret For­mu­la to Win the OTT Race Kei­th Zubchevich talks about the impor­tance of qual­i­ty over quan­ti­ty.   But how do you mea­sure qual­i­ty? In our data crazed world most sure­ly the algo­rithm mas­ters will find a way. Some would say that qual­i­ty pro­gram­ming only comes from expe­ri­enced direc­tors and pro­duc­ers.  Some of the most suc­cess­ful shows like House of Cards and Home­land are cre­at­ed, writ­ten and pro­duced by sea­soned pro­fes­sion­als. It’s dif­fi­cult to guar­an­tee the cre­ation of lots of suc­cess­ful shows.  OTT providers will employ dif­fer­ent strate­gies to accom­plish this objec­tive.  Per­haps some OTT providers may opt to buy cable net­works and/or a cable com­pa­ny.  Per­haps Ama­zon will buy Com­cast. Are YouTube Stars Pro­fes­sion­al? Would you con­sid­er Michelle Phan, one of the longest sus­tain­ing YouTube stars…

Read More

Marriot and Samsung turn your Hotel room into a Virtual Reality Fantasy Hub!

Marriot and Samsung turn your Hotel room into a Virtual Reality Fantasy Hub!

Mar­riot hotels is tri­al­ing a new enter­tain­ment ser­vice that would bring Vir­tu­al Real­i­ty into your rooms with a Sam­sung VR head­set and head­phones. The team up of Mar­riot and Sam­sung are call­ing it the “Vroom Ser­vice” and are test­ing it for a cou­ple of week in their New York and Lon­don hotels. The VR head­sets and head­phones will be deliv­ered direct to a guest’s bed­room where they can enjoy an “in-room vir­tu­al real­i­ty trav­el expe­ri­ence.” Last Sep­tem­ber Mar­riot had tried a full sen­so­ry sim­u­la­tor that uti­lized an Ocu­lus Rift heas­d­set with envi­ron­men­tal con­trol (i.e., wind, smell, tem­per­a­ture) for giv­ing vir­tu­al guid­ed tours of Hawaii and Lon­don. Coin­cid­ing with the Vroom Ser­vice will be “VR Post­cards”, an all-new VR con­tent plat­form that pro­vides an “inti­mate and immer­sive trav­el sto­ries that users expe­ri­ence in 360 3D via a vir­tu­al real­i­ty head­set”. Matthew Car­roll VP at Mar­riot Hotels says “VRoom com­bines sto­ry­telling with tech­nol­o­gy, two things that are impor­tant to next gen­er­a­tion trav­el­ers.” Some of your first VR expe­ri­ences will be an ice-cream shop in Rwan­da, Chile’s Andes Moun­tains, and the streets of Bei­jing. If VR just isn’t your thing, Mar­riot also locked down Net­flix (jobs at Net­flix) for your hotel room TV. Sweet!…

Read More

Cable and Satellite Services are Dead, Long Live Video Streaming.

Cable and Satellite Services are Dead, Long Live Video Streaming.

Dur­ing a recent con­fer­ence Net­flix CEO Reed Hast­ings per­ceived that lin­ear TV (basi­cal­ly cable and satel­lite ser­vices) would start to decline in view­er­ship and that in the next two decades Inter­net TV would take over. Well the results as of late make his pre­dic­tions appear to be true. Net­flix (find jobs at Net­flix) shares have soared 70% this year as the video stream­ing leader has topped sub­scriber growth expec­ta­tions twice; it added near­ly 2.28 mil­lion domes­tic mem­bers in its most recent quar­ter, rep­re­sent­ing near­ly 20% growth from the pre­vi­ous year. People’s rela­tion­ship with tra­di­tion­al TV has grad­u­al­ly been chang­ing; mil­len­ni­als have been decreas­ing Lin­ear TV con­sump­tion, which dropped by 20% last year. Accord­ing to media research firm Mof­fett Nathanson, pay-TV sub­scrip­tions fell by 31,000 in the first quar­ter. The first set of data on pay-TV sub­scrip­tions for the year has come in, show­ing that the indus­try is declin­ing faster than thought. It’s a cord-cut­t­ing rev­o­lu­tion which appears to be accel­er­at­ing. Pay-TV sub­scrip­tions fell by 95,000 in 2013 and increased to 125,000 in 2014. About 150,000 pay-TV cus­tomers can­celed video ser­vice in the three months that end­ed June 30, accord­ing to esti­mates pub­lished on Fri­day by Leicht­man Research Group. It could be…

Read More