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Welcome to Media Jobs: ECommerce Jobs

The Career Intelligence™ Authority

The days of phys­i­cal shop­ping and large-scale mega stores is now chal­lenged by the new shop­ping par­a­digm, Ecom­merce. Over $194 Bil­lion dol­lars was spent In 2011 online through Ecom­merce which rep­re­sents a fast grow­ing per­cent­age of the buy­ing and sell­ing that takes place through­out the world. Media Jobs in Ecom­merce are grow­ing expo­nen­tial­ly. Pro­fes­sion­als who are look­ing for an ecom­merce job or infor­ma­tion on the lat­est ecom­merce jobs can use MediaJobs.com to find the lat­est, most accu­rate infor­ma­tion. Land­ing a great ecom­merce job is pos­si­ble, and it’s eas­i­er to make the con­nec­tions with peo­ple, com­pa­nies and prod­ucts that will steer you toward the per­fect e com­merce job when you use the resources at Mediajobs.com. Here, you can find infor­ma­tion on the biggest ecom­merce com­pa­nies and web­sites in the world. Multi­bil­lion dol­lar Ecom­merce dri­ven cor­po­ra­tions include Amazon.com, Sta­ples, Apple, Wal­mart, Dell, Office Depot, Sears Hold­ings, Net­flix, Best Buy, QVC, Home Shop­ping Net­work, Macy’s, Sony, Vic­to­ri­a’s Secret Direct, and J.C. Pen­ney Com­pa­ny and invest mil­lions in ecom­merce plat­forms each year. MediaJobs.com has infor­ma­tion on the top com­pa­nies, peo­ple, prod­ucts and jobs with­in these grow­ing ecom­merce fields. We’ve also col­lect­ed infor­ma­tion about the up and com­ing ecom­merce oppor­tu­ni­ties with com­pa­nies such as Sys­temax, Over­stock, Amway, Red­cats USA, Vistaprint, Buy.com, and many more. The arti­cles below con­tain infor­ma­tion that will help you in your ecom­merce job search. You can also click here or use our search box to find infor­ma­tion about a spe­cif­ic ecom­merce com­pa­ny.

BloomNation heads for New York as it expands to become the Etsy for flowers

BloomNation heads for New York as it expands to become the Etsy for flowers

Imag­ine you’re an ecom­merce man­ag­er by day but a pok­er whizz-kid by night; the chances are that if you won an event at the World Series of Pok­er, flow­ers wouldn’t be the first thing on your mind. But they were on pok­er afi­ciona­do David Daneshgar’s mind when he won a WSP even in 2008. Maybe our day­dream­ing e‑commerce man­ag­er might wish to think again: Danesh­gar and his two bud­dies, Far­bod Shora­ka and Gregg Weis­stein, used the $27,000 win­nings to launch a new online florist mar­ket­place. A blos­som­ing mar­ket­place  Born in 2011, Bloom­Na­tion is on course to grow into the Etsy of the flower indus­try and is embark­ing this month on an ambi­tious new expan­sion. New York City is amongst the new loca­tions the LA-based com­pa­ny is recruit­ing local arti­san florists, while oth­ers include Wash­ing­ton, D.C., Boston and Philadel­phia (it’s already had suc­cess­ful launch­es in Las Vegas and Chica­go). Per­spic­u­ous e‑commerce ana­lysts will be aware that local arti­sans have ener­gized online food and craft mar­kets recent­ly. Danesh­gar, Shora­ka and Weis­stein (who met at col­lege) are tap­ping their tal­ents for the flower-send­ing mar­ket. And they’re suc­ceed­ing: Bloom­Na­tion won the Uni­ver­si­ty of Chica­go School of Busi­ness’ New Ven­ture Chal­lenge in 2012 and it…

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The rise and rise of gourmet cook-at-home meal-kit subscription service Blue Apron

Busy e‑commerce man­agers, like every­one after hard day’s work, need to eat when they arrive home quak­ing with hunger. How­ev­er, decid­ing what to cook can be a drag, espe­cial­ly if you need to go back out to the gro­cery store to fetch that all-impor­­tant garam masala or turmer­ic. New York e‑commerce start­up Blue Apron is tak­ing the strain out of home cook­ing for busy pro­fes­sion­als with its sub­scrip­tion deliv­ery ser­vice of mouth­wa­ter­ing meal kits that top chefs would approve of. Every e‑commerce manager’s dream  Accord­ing to For­tune, the start­up, which launched in 2012, is about to close a Series C round esti­mat­ed to be between $40million and $50million, and a $500million val­u­a­tion. It’s got some com­pe­ti­tion, to be sure (New York neigh­bor Plat­ed being one), but it seems to be get­ting a lot right. While some rivals, like Los Ange­les-based Pop­Up Pantry, have gone to the wall, Blue Apron is going from strength to strength. At the end of March, it announced it was serv­ing half a mil­lion meals per month – way up from the 100,000 per month it was deliv­er­ing in August last year. At $10 per meal, that trans­lates into a rev­enue run rate of $60 mil­lion.…

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Mobile payment startup Square brings a virtual currency world closer with new partnership with Coinbase

A sci-fi world where we all car­ry vir­tu­al cur­ren­cy in pref­er­ence to the ‘real’ stuff has come a step clos­er, thanks to a new part­ner­ship between the increas­ing­ly pop­u­lar mobile pay­ment provider Square and Bit­coin wal­let Coin­base. It doesn’t take a sea­soned prod­uct man­ag­er to rec­og­nize that this is a poten­tial­ly big devel­op­ment for the future of the cryp­tocur­ren­cy. Sim­ple and pain­less for buy­er and sell­er alike All goods and ser­vices on the startup’s online store­front, Square Mar­ket­place, will now be avail­able to buy with Bit­coin as well as with tra­di­tion­al bank or cred­it cards (the Mar­ket­place in a kind of vir­tu­al one-stop-shop fea­tur­ing items from ecom­merce mer­chants who are actu­al­ly geo­graph­i­cal­ly scat­tered across the world). The more skep­ti­cal prod­uct man­ag­er may be spec­u­lat­ing whether this is just a shame­less attempt to ride the Bit­coin hype wave; but he or she would be wrong. Square’s mar­ket lead, Ajit Var­ma, explains in the com­pa­ny blog announc­ing the move that sell­ers won’t notice any­thing dif­fer­ent (apart per­haps from bet­ter sales) and buy­ers will find it sim­ple and pain­less, thanks to the adroit tech­no­log­i­cal pro­cess­ing Square has put in place. Buy­ers sim­ply scan the QR code in their Bit­coin wal­lets to load the…

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Birchbox follows Warby Parker, Bonobos, with new bricks-and-mortar store alongside its ecommerce site

Most savvy ecom­merce ana­lysts are aware that ecom­merce has been under­go­ing a makeover of late: the way to go, after estab­lish­ing an online pres­ence, appears to be com­bin­ing web-based ecom­merce stores with the bricks-and-mor­­tar vari­ety. And New York-based sub­scrip­tion beau­ty prod­uct start­up Birch­box has just decid­ed to take that par­tic­u­lar bull by the horns as it turns four years of age. As report­ed in the New York Times, a new per­ma­nent retail store is mov­ing out of the plan­ning stage and is due to open on West Broad­way in Manhattan’s SoHo shop­ping dis­trict very short­ly (prob­a­bly May). Growth poten­tial Co-founders Katia Beauchamp (31) and Hay­ley Bar­na (30), who became friends and found­ed Birch­box while stu­dents at Har­vard Busi­ness School, say the new ini­tia­tive has less to do with in-store rev­enues than with the growth poten­tial a bricks-and-mor­­tar store can offer. As Ms. Beauchamp puts it: “We are not focused on prof­itabil­i­ty, we are focused on hyper­growth. We like the idea of build­ing a store along with the busi­ness.” The per­spic­u­ous ecom­merce ana­lyst will rec­og­nize that Birch­box is fol­low­ing a length­en­ing line of suc­cess­ful ecom­merce star­tups which, hav­ing enjoyed con­nect­ing with real life cus­tomers via pop-up shops, decid­ed to acquire per­ma­nent…

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Can New York ecommerce startup Grand St do for indie hardware designers what Etsy did for indie crafters?

Even a novice ecom­merce ana­lyst would con­cur that if an ecom­merce start­up man­ages to achieve a repeat-buy­er rate of 40 per­cent and cross­es the $1 mil­lion mark in rev­enues after just six months of trad­ing, it’s onto a pret­ty hot busi­ness idea. And this is pre­cise­ly what Grand St., the New York start­up aim­ing to become the Etsy of elec­tron­ics, has done. Etsy for elec­tron­ics  Co-founder Aman­da Pey­ton real­ized that there are tens of thou­sands of hard­ware star­tups in exis­tence, cre­at­ing seri­ous­ly snazzy con­sumer gad­gets that you sim­ply won’t find in stores. Things like “Ever­purse”, a bag that dou­bles as a smart­phone recharg­er, or mod­u­lar robot­ic kits, or “smart” dog col­lars. The list goes on. After curat­ing a small dai­ly selec­tion of goods since its launch last July, the start­up decid­ed last month to expand its ecom­merce store into a larg­er mar­ket­place for indie hard­ware design­ers. Apt­ly named “Mar­ket­place”, the new ini­tia­tive has a num­ber of key fea­tures which sea­soned ecom­merce ana­lysts will rec­og­nize have real poten­tial to make it the elec­tron­ics ver­sion of Etsy. Firms with prod­ucts ready for pur­chase can list them on Grand St, which takes an 8 per­cent cut of the sales. But Mar­ket­place will also…

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