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Is Salesforce a Great Place to Work?

jobs at salesforce

Inter­act­ing with cus­tomers has been impor­tant for com­pa­nies since the first busi­ness trans­ac­tion took place, but Sales­force took that idea to a new lev­el when they pio­neered the first cloud-based CRM (cus­tomer rela­tion­ship man­age­ment) plat­form back in 1999 to facil­i­tate sales automa­tion and cus­tomer inter­ac­tions. Twen­ty years lat­er, the com­pa­ny has remained a lead­ing force in every aspect of cus­tomer ser­vice and rela­tions, sales and mar­ket­ing automa­tion, busi­ness ana­lyt­ics, and appli­ca­tion devel­op­ment relat­ed to this entire field, help­ing more than 150,000 busi­ness­es run their oper­a­tions more effi­cient­ly. Praise for the Busi­ness With cur­rent rev­enues report­ed at $13.28 bil­lion and a work­force of around 35,000, SalesForce.com is a force to be reck­oned with, no pun intend­ed, in the busi­ness world. But beyond that, they’re also con­sid­ered a great place to work, which is why you may want to con­sid­er look­ing into the almost 1,000 avail­able jobs at Sales­force. In 2018 they were ranked num­ber one in For­tune’s 100 Best Com­pa­nies to Work For and have been on that list for 10 years in a row, in addi­tion to tak­ing the top spot in at least two oth­er sim­i­lar lists last year alone. The pro­fes­sion­al acco­lades don’t stop there, either. Oth­er notable awards include being named on…

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How fast is this Blockchain thing going to take over?

How fast is this Blockchain thing going to take over?

Well that was fast, rel­a­tive­ly speak­ing, we’re talk­ing about Blockchain of course. Ever since Bit­coin hit the scene a few years ago there has been mas­sive skep­ti­cism and con­cern over the use of cryp­­to-cur­ren­­cy, pri­mar­i­ly by gov­ern­ments and mul­ti-nation­al busi­ness­es that fear the loss of con­trol to the pub­lic. Of course the Mil­len­ni­al gen­er­a­tion has embraced this new fron­tier fair­ly whole-heart­ed­­ly, with 92% of them firm­ly express­ing their dis­trust of banks accord­ing to an ear­ly 2016 white paper pub­lished by Face­book IQ. While many peo­ple in the gen­er­al pub­lic still don’t real­ly under­stand what Bit­coin or cryp­­to-cur­ren­­cy is, or the tech­nol­o­gy behind it. But sud­den­ly major cor­po­ra­tions are embrac­ing blockchain tech­nol­o­gy at a record pace, not nec­es­sar­i­ly for cur­ren­cy relat­ed issues but for oth­er appli­ca­tions which can great­ly ben­e­fit from the supe­ri­or track­ing abil­i­ties it enables. Sur­vey Says Nor­mal­ly an inter­net-based sur­vey has about as much of a chance at being cred­i­ble as a polling orga­ni­za­tion dur­ing the 2016 pres­i­den­tial elec­tion cycle (zing! ouch!). How­ev­er, when that sur­vey is done by Deloitte one tends to give it the ben­e­fit of the doubt to some extent. The sur­vey in ques­tion found that 12% of big busi­ness­es, defined as a busi­ness with at least $500 mil­lion in…

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Can SyncThink Read Your Mind?

Can SyncThink Read Your Mind?

Boston-based Sync­Think has received their tenth patent in the US, if it holds up to legal chal­lenges from oth­er VR com­pa­nies explor­ing sim­i­lar advances. The patent is relat­ed to track­ing eye move­ments in vir­tu­al real­i­ty head­sets, an appli­ca­tion which they’ve already put to good med­ical use and which has the poten­tial to open up many new pos­si­bil­i­ties in VR tech­nol­o­gy. Ear­li­er this year Sync­Think, found­ed by Dr. Jamshid Gha­jar, MD, PhD, FACS, and Pres­i­dent of the Brain Trau­ma Foun­da­tion, gained FDA approval for their EYE-SYNC device. EYE-SYNC is a neu­ro-tech­nol­o­­gy device which tracks eye move­ments is order to deter­mine if a sports play­er has devel­oped a con­cus­sion dur­ing or after a game. The device tracks the eyes for abnor­mal move­ment, which is a hall­mark of con­cus­sions, and accord­ing to the com­pa­ny can return a diag­no­sis in six­ty sec­onds, and is accu­rate and reli­able. Stan­ford Uni­ver­si­ty’s Sports Med­i­cine pro­gram is already using EYE-SYNC to screen ath­letes dur­ing games and deter­mine whether they can return to play, and they believe it could become the diag­nos­tic gold stan­dard for sports-relat­ed con­cus­sions with every team and orga­ni­za­tion from high school through the pro­fes­sion­al lev­el. While sports and mil­i­tary injuries are the pri­ma­ry focus right now, the impli­ca­tions…

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Is 360 Video the Future of Media?

Is 360 video the future of media?

Know any­thing about 360 Video? It’s said that the best tech is the tech you don’t notice. The same idea could be restat­ed as, a rev­o­lu­tion­ary new break­through has­n’t real­ly achieved suc­cess until its reached crit­i­cal mass as a part of the gen­er­al pub­lic’s every­day rou­tines. So while vir­tu­al real­i­ty is arguably one of the coolest tech devel­op­ments in his­to­ry, it’s still essen­tial­ly sit­ting on the side­lines as a nov­el­ty. Grant­ed, it’s try­ing hard to get in the game, but so far it’s still the favorite new toy of the cut­ting edge crowd. 2017 could be the year that changes, that the first killer app for VR brings it onto Main Street. There are signs that this is com­ing, and one of them is just now devel­op­ing across a num­ber of “main­stream” areas — 360 videos. 360 Video is it! Your Panoram­ic Pho­to is Old School 360 videos are next evo­lu­tion from the panoram­ic pho­tos tak­en with smart­phones, which might be con­sid­ered the most basic form of VR. Of course they need spe­cial omni-direc­­tion­al cam­eras or a spe­cial rig with mul­ti­ple cam­eras to shoot them, which smart­phones don’t have (yet), in order to cap­ture a 360 degree view of the…

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What can BlockAI and blockchain technology do for you?

What can BlockAI and the blockchain do for you?

Blockchain tech­nol­o­gy will change your life.  But how you ask? When I was younger I played in sev­er­al bands, and in some we wrote our own music. My longest run­ning and most suc­cess­ful ven­ture (which con­sist­ed of two record­ed albums and most­ly free beer for pay­ment from the clubs we played) was with sev­er­al of my clos­est child­hood friends, one of whom wrote all of our music. When he want­ed to ensure that his intel­lec­tu­al prop­er­ty (the songs) were pro­tect­ed, he would mail them to him­self and then save them unopened just in case. The fact that they were post­marked by the US postal ser­vice, if unopened, served as an inex­pen­sive way to pro­vide proof that he had actu­al­ly cre­at­ed them at a cer­tain time. So if years down the road he sud­den­ly heard his song play­ing on the radio but it was­n’t him per­form­ing it, he could just pull out the post­marked pack­age and head to a lawyer. Today artis­tic cre­ations are most­ly dig­i­tal, so hav­ing proof of cre­ation is more dif­fi­cult. Any­one can fake a time stamp on an image, after all. Unless, of course, that time stamp is in the blockchain. If you’re unfa­mil­iar with blockchain tech­nol­o­gy, it’s the per­ma­nent,…

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