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What can BlockAI and blockchain technology do for you?

What can BlockAI and the blockchain do for you?

Blockchain tech­nol­o­gy will change your life.  But how you ask? When I was younger I played in sev­er­al bands, and in some we wrote our own music. My longest run­ning and most suc­cess­ful ven­ture (which con­sist­ed of two record­ed albums and most­ly free beer for pay­ment from the clubs we played) was with sev­er­al of my clos­est child­hood friends, one of whom wrote all of our music. When he want­ed to ensure that his intel­lec­tu­al prop­er­ty (the songs) were pro­tect­ed, he would mail them to him­self and then save them unopened just in case. The fact that they were post­marked by the US postal ser­vice, if unopened, served as an inex­pen­sive way to pro­vide proof that he had actu­al­ly cre­at­ed them at a cer­tain time. So if years down the road he sud­den­ly heard his song play­ing on the radio but it was­n’t him per­form­ing it, he could just pull out the post­marked pack­age and head to a lawyer. Today artis­tic cre­ations are most­ly dig­i­tal, so hav­ing proof of cre­ation is more dif­fi­cult. Any­one can fake a time stamp on an image, after all. Unless, of course, that time stamp is in the blockchain. If you’re unfa­mil­iar with blockchain tech­nol­o­gy, it’s the per­ma­nent,…

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UltraHaptics — Control Everything with Just the Wave of a Hand

UltraHaptics - control everything with just the wave of a hand

What is Ultra­Hap­tics up to and where is this tak­ing us?  Sound is a real­ly fas­ci­nat­ing thing. It’s just vibra­tions in space, which the­o­ret­i­cal physi­cists think is what makes up all mat­ter. If you’re an X‑Men fan you’ll remem­ber Ban­shee, the guy who could cause destruc­tion with his screams. The inter­est­ing thing is that his mutant abil­i­ty mim­ics real­i­ty, but it’s not the vol­ume of the scream so much as the fre­quen­cy. In fact, some sci­en­tists have pos­tured that the ancient Bib­li­cal sto­ry of the impen­e­tra­ble walls of Jeri­cho falling at the blast of a bunch of trum­pets (or sho­fars) total­ly could have hap­pened. So back to the premise — sound is fas­ci­nat­ing. And the appli­ca­tions now being devel­oped in ultra­sound (the fre­quen­cies that humans can’t hear) might be the next big evo­lu­tion in vir­tu­al real­i­ty. Then again, they might also soon make it eas­i­er for you to dri­ve your car with­out dis­trac­tions or con­trol your home stereo with vir­tu­al hap­tic con­trols. A 70’s Throw­back In the 1970’s sci­en­tists explored the idea of using ultra­son­ic waves, or ultra­sound, to cre­ate sim­u­lat­ed tac­tile sen­sa­tions or hap­tics — mean­ing feel­ing some­thing that was­n’t actu­al­ly there. But com­put­ers and pro­gram­ming weren’t there yet, and the…

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Waygo Translation App takes you out for Chinese

Waygo Translation App takes you out for Chinese

Ryan  Rogows­ki, CEO and Cofounder of San Fran­cis­co based Way­go Trans­la­tion App believes that with­in our life­time, we’ll be able to trans­late and speak mul­ti­ple lan­guages flu­ent­ly with the help of tech­nol­o­gy. “I think lan­guage as a bar­ri­er is being solved and it’s an excit­ing time to be part of the indus­try. With glob­al­iza­tion hap­pen­ing so fast, there’s this giant prob­lem. But the base tech­nol­o­gy and hard­ware is pret­ty much already there. It’s just now improv­ing the research and soft­ware to get things done effi­cient­ly for you.” Way­go is an aug­ment­ed real­i­ty start­up that focus­es on visu­al, real-time trans­la­tion for Asian coun­tries (cur­rent­ly Chi­nese, Japan and Korea). All you need to do is point your smartphone’s cam­era at the words in ques­tion and the app will trans­late into Eng­lish in sec­onds, trans­lat­ing your desired for­eign dish is made eas­i­er.  It gives users an in-depth knowl­edge of for­eign cui­sine by pro­vid­ing detailed images of how food dish­es are pre­pared while brows­ing restau­rant menus. “Way­go has evolved as a pre­mier menu trans­la­tion app that encour­ages trav­el­ers to live and dine like the locals, with­out the wor­ry of order­ing the wrong menu item.”  The Way­go team had researched Chi­nese restau­rant menus, cov­er­ing the…

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E‑Payments in Cars with “Selfies” Facial Recognition and Fingerprints, Oh Boy!

E-Payments in Cars with Selfies and fingerprints, Oh Boy!

The sad truth is we cur­rent­ly live in a world where every­one wants to get paid, and fast; so Fresh­books, Visa and Mas­ter­card are work­ing towards mak­ing E‑payments occur as fast as human­ly pos­si­ble.  So how are all these quick trans­ac­tions of cur­ren­cy going to hap­pen?  Let’s first take a look at what Fresh­books is up to.  Found­ed in Toron­to back in 2003 as a cloud based accoun­tan­cy soft­ware, they’ve moved into the cred­it card read­er busi­ness to accept cards through a smart­phone.  They announced it back in Decem­ber and have test­ed it with invite only cus­tomers for a lim­it­ed time.  Their $29 read­er is a direct com­peti­tor for Jack Dorsey’s Square which went pub­lic 3 months ago. The read­er unit that plugs direct­ly into an iPhone’s audio jack and is designed to help free­lancers and small-busi­­ness own­ers go “cash-free” by accept­ing most com­mon bank pay­ment cards.  How­ev­er, the card read­er inte­grates with Fresh­Books broad­er soft­ware offer­ing, mean­ing that mer­chants’ invoic­es and finan­cial reports will be synced in real time when each pay­ment is processed.  In addi­tion to the $29, mer­chants will be charged 2.7 per­cent + $0.30 for each Visa and Mas­ter­Card trans­ac­tion, and 3.4 per­cent + $0.30 for Amer­i­can…

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Diffbot — Machine learning is the new Big Data and Giving it away might be a Money Maker.

Machine learning is the new Big Data and Giving it away might be a Money Maker.

“Everything’s becom­ing intel­li­gent, but the lim­it­ing fac­tor of intel­li­gence is access to struc­tured data,” Tung says. Diff­bot, an arti­fi­cial intel­li­gence com­pa­ny that helps clients extract and com­bine data from mul­ti­ple Web sources wants to scrape all the data on the web (all of it) to put it into a struc­tured for­mat. Mak­ing it use­ful for all sorts of busi­ness pur­pos­es and make mon­ey doing so.  The com­pa­ny says its tech­nol­o­gy “uses com­put­er vision and NLP algo­rithms to extract and struc­ture any web page into the world’s largest struc­tured data­base… with no human cura­tion or over­sight.” Found­ed in 2009 The Palo Alto, CA-based start­up announced today it raised $10 mil­lion from investors to expand its “knowl­­edge-as-a-ser­vice” offer­ings to busi­ness­es and con­sumer apps.  They have raised close to $13 mil­lion since its seed round in 2012.  Diffbot’s plan is to cat­a­log tril­lions of facts across the Web—many of them drawn from page ele­ments such as com­ment forums, which can’t be mined by tra­di­tion­al search engines. Web-min­ing can be a com­pet­i­tive advan­tage for apps as well as the pro­lif­er­at­ing devices of the Inter­net of Things, Tung says. The start­up says it has made a sig­nif­i­cant start on that goal, hav­ing indexed 1.2 bil­lion…

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