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Is Salesforce a Great Place to Work? -

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Friday, June 7, 2019

Manager Instructional Technology at George Washington University -

Thursday, October 4, 2018

5 Highest Paying Business Development Manager Jobs in New York -

Monday, July 23, 2018

What kind of Business Development
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QVC , On Air Program Host Job for 3rd Largest Ecommerce Company -

Monday, March 26, 2018

Facebook has over 1700 Jobs: Here is How to Get a Job at Facebook -

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Nielsen Why You Want to Work at this Digital Transformation Organization -

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Why You Want a Job at Twitter -

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How fast is this Blockchain thing going to take over? -

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Should You Work at HBO or Netflix? -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Why Working at Hearst is Much Better than Houghton Mifflin Harcourt -

Friday, January 26, 2018

What Will Making a VR Game While in Virtual Reality be like? -

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Why You Want to Work at Snapchat -

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Is it Better to work at Buzzfeed or The New York Times? -

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LeBook Business Development Job for Trend Setter -

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Executive Editor Job at Philadelphia Gay News -

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Is Apple a Great Place to Work?

working at apple

It would be real­ly hard to find some­one, any­where in the world that does­n’t instant­ly rec­og­nize the Apple brand. Head­quar­tered in Cuper­ti­no, CA, It’s the largest tech­nol­o­gy com­pa­ny in the world as mea­sured by rev­enue, the first pub­lic U.S. com­pa­ny to ever hit $1 tril­lion in mar­ket val­ue, and as of 2018 had about $236 bil­lion in liq­uid assets (cash and mar­ketable secu­ri­ties). In 2018 it’s world­wide rev­enue was $265 bil­lion. Despite a few rocky moments over the decades, Apple has been a tech­nol­o­gy pow­er­house from its begin­nings in the late 1970s. After ear­ly suc­cess with per­son­al com­put­ers (the Apple I, Apple II, and orig­i­nal Mac­in­tosh), founders Steve Woz­ni­ak and Steve Jobs both left the com­pa­ny. Apple strug­gled into the 1990s due to the suc­cess of Microsoft offer­ing low­er-priced com­put­ers, but recov­ered after Jobs became the CEO again in 2000. Since then they have con­tin­u­al­ly rein­vent­ed the tech­nol­o­gy world with the iPod, iPhone, iPad, iTunes, and of course iOS com­put­ers, in addi­tion to numer­ous oth­er relat­ed ven­tures. As any top com­pa­ny will, they’ve had their share of con­tro­ver­sies over the years, but they always sur­vive them and con­tin­ue to grow. Work­ing at Apple From the per­spec­tive of a job seek­er, Apple in…

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Is Pinterest trying to take the Internet by Storm with the click of a Button?

Is Pinterest trying to take the Internet by Storm with the click of a Button?

Mar­keters make note! Pin­ter­est recent­ly unveiled that it will be launch­ing “buyable pins” lat­er this month, here’s how it works: Rich Pins are pins which have much more infor­ma­tion than a nor­mal link, for instance a step by step info­graph­ic on oven clean­ing will get a new but­ton that allows users to pur­chase ovens direct­ly from retail part­ners like Macy’s, Nord­stroms and so on in order to stock Pin­ter­est with mil­lions of prod­ucts. Users will see prices, be able to select spe­cif­ic types of a prod­uct, and then they can tap the but­ton to buy the prod­uct. Which is then shipped direct­ly to you. Pin­ter­est is using Shopi­fy (jobs at Shopi­fy) and Demand­ware (jobs at Demand­ware) right out of the gate with Stripe han­dling its pay­ments, and col­lab­o­rat­ing with com­pa­nies like Brain­tree and Apple to “make sure Pin­ter­est nev­er touch­es cred­it card infor­ma­tion.” They claim there isn’t any fee for buy­ers and mer­chants which they says will include work­ing with tens of thou­sands of local brands. Buyable Pins show up in all of Pinterest’s fea­tures, like rec­om­men­da­tions and search. Users can pay with a cred­it card or with Apple Pay. It appears that this is just a tip of the Ice­berg…

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The Pebble smart watch finally arrives on doorsteps to a chorus of approval

After wow­ing donors at Kick­starter last year to such an extent that it went away with over $10 mil­lion in invest­ment, Peb­ble has final­ly start­ed ship­ping its smart wrist­watch, which has been hit­ting doorsteps for a few weeks now. E‑commerce man­agers and e‑commerce ana­lysts want­i­ng to know more about expec­ta­tion man­age­ment could learn a lot from Peb­ble.  After promis­ing ship­ments would begin last fall, a huge order back­log ensured and it took con­sid­er­ably longer to get the ball rolling.  But it’s been extra­or­di­nar­i­ly deft at keep­ing its pre-order cus­tomers reg­u­lar­ly and ful­ly informed via sto­ries, videos and pho­tos. Mass pro­duc­tion The first recip­i­ents, of course, have been the startup’s Kick­starter back­ers, but with mass pro­duc­tion now in full momen­tum with 15,000 being man­u­fac­tured every week, every­one else who pre-ordered will soon have theirs if it hasn’t already arrived.  The watch, which con­nects to the iPhone and to Android devices, is mod­est­ly hand­some as opposed to riotous­ly gor­geous, but that crisp, cus­tomiz­able, black-and-white e‑paper dis­play is a real win­ner, remain­ing high­ly read­able even in sun­light. E‑commerce ana­lysts keen to spot the next big thing might do well to fol­low the Pebble’s for­tunes. It not only dis­plays incom­ing caller IDs, Face­book mes­sages,…

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Guy Kawasaki – the Evangelist Who Heard the Apple Angels Singing

He was one of the lucky few; one of the found­ing fathers of Apple, get­ting a job straight out of col­lege through his roomie Mike Boich. Guy Kawasa­ki cred­its his Apple expe­ri­ence with many great things, but most­ly for the chance to work for one of the world’s most excit­ing com­pa­nies and carve out a career as one of the first true dig­i­tal pio­neers. If you want to make your mark and you’re on the look­out for media jobs, Kawasaki’s lead is one you might want to fol­low. Cur­rent­ly Kawasa­ki, who was born in Hawaii, is founder of Garage Tech­nol­o­gy Ven­tures and co-founder of Alltop.com, an online mag­a­zine rack giv­ing users easy access to the web’s most pop­u­lar top­ics, but he wasn’t always at the fore­front of online inno­va­tion. From Hon­olu­lu to Sil­i­con Val­ley Born in 1954 in one of the tougher neigh­bour­hoods of Hon­olu­lu, Guy Kawasa­ki attend­ed Iolani School, which he states gave him a ‘fan­tas­tic and for­ma­tive edu­ca­tion’. He has par­tic­u­lar­ly fond mem­o­ries of his Eng­lish teacher who, he believes, would have been shocked to learn that he’s writ­ten 10 books. After grad­u­at­ing Iolani in 1972, Kawasa­ki made the jour­ney to Stan­ford where he grad­u­at­ed with a major…

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Mobile ad analytics startup Adelphic gains $10 million investment

Mobile ad analytics startup Adelphic gains $10 million investment

Ad tar­get­ing start­up Adel­ph­ic Mobile looks set to enhance the world of mobile phones adver­tis­ing dra­mat­i­cal­ly after secur­ing $10 mil­lion in Series A fund­ing. Mobile adver­tis­ing agen­cies face par­tic­u­lar dif­fi­cul­ties not shared by their more tra­di­tion­al inter­net ad rel­a­tives; it’s noto­ri­ous­ly dif­fi­cult to col­lect reli­able con­sumer data from mobile devices, unlike web sites which allow brands to tar­get par­tic­u­lar users with rel­a­tive ease. But Adel­ph­ic Mobile was cre­at­ed by for­mer Quat­tro col­leagues Jen­nifer Lum and Changfeng Weng in 2010 to address that very prob­lem (Quat­tro was acquired by Apple recent­ly and is now the tech giant’s iAd pro­gram). Why mobile adver­tis­ing is a tough cook­ie Jen­nifer Lum summed up the dif­fi­cul­ties posed by mobile adver­tis­ing like this: “It’s hard for brands to find peo­ple.  It’s hard to describe and pack­age up the mobile indus­try to sell to audi­ences.” There have been a num­ber of new mobile tar­get­ing star­tups launch­ing in recent times, includ­ing AdMo­bius. But what’s dif­fer­ent about Adel­ph­ic? The new agency sur­mounts the dif­fi­cul­ty of drop­ping cook­ies onto mobiles (col­lect far few­er of these lit­tle data pack­ets than desk­top devices) by using 30 dif­fer­ent ‘sig­nals’ to mon­i­tor online pat­terns exhib­it­ed by smart­phone users. Although Lum wasn’t let­ting any secrets…

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